Art Student Must Watch

Movies Every Art Student Must Watch

Gerardo Correa
August 26, 2019 0 Comment

Art had been a commonality in film, whether it be the focal point or a conceptual addition. Due to this, teachers had made watching movies on 123movieshub a form of homework if they wanted their students to learn more about a particular topic. However, if you want to learn more about them on your own, here’s a list to get you started.

Frida (2002)

The film chronicles the key events that made the artist, Frida Kahlo, the woman she is now known to be. From that fateful tragic accidental to her whirlwind romance with the equally prominent Diego Rivera, this is a tale of humanity as it is of feminine revolution.

The Hours (2002)

This story tells of three women from different lifetimes intertwined by a book and connected by a certain sensibility – there are as well three suicides. However, it is not pandering on the idea of pain, rather an exploration of how art, in the form of writing, also takes a life form through how, what, and why we love.

The Spider, the Mistress, and the Tangerine (2008)

The presentation may appear quite slapdash, but no holds were barred by the artist, Louis Bourgeois, as she spoke in candor about her works and her philosophy. The documentary is an exploration of her life and loves, and how this reverberated towards the art that made her name.

Wasteland (2010)

This is the renowned artist Vik Muniz’s journey to the world’s largest garbage dump as was documented for nearly three years. It shows how the creative process changed as the artist’s empathy grew for the subjects he now considers friends and collaborators – this was as he realized the amount of dignity and despair is etched on the photographs he took.

Exit Through the Gift Shop (2010)

A French shopkeeper turned documentary maker attempts to find and befriend the globally-famous graffiti artist, Banksy. This initiative will not turn out the way any of us would have expected, but this is one interesting snapshot of street culture and artistry in action.

The Radiant Child (2010)

As the narrative unfolds through a series of interviews and archival footage, NY City painter Jean-Michel Basquiat is put under a thoughtful light. This film focuses on his youth, friendships, struggle with acclaim and fame due to his ethnicity, and the mystique he brought with his name as he maneuvered his way through a predominantly white industry.

Never Sorry (2012)

This is the first documentary to feature the artistic inclinations and social activism of internationally acclaimed Chinese artist, Ai Weiwei. Although it can’t entirely capture his elusive nature, it portrays him as two more things other than an artist: a man of his family, and a man against the state.

The Artist is Present (2012)

Once again, Marina Abramovic contests the typical definition of art by taking it to another level where the artist will establish a profoundly silent but strong connection to a “spectator” through a locked mutual gaze. This experience may not have the same effect for all, but it is agreeably beyond words.

Big Eyes (2014)

The struggle, awakening, and triumph for women in the art industry encapsulate what this film is about as Margaret Keane both serves a husband who had taken credit for her art and battles him against a claim to what is truly hers from the start.

Loving Vincent (2017)

After the death of Van Gogh, the delivery of a letter steers a man back to the artist’s past. This is yet another exploration of the much-repeated demise of a famous tragic figure, but this time, depicted with hand-painted oil painting animation.

While already watching movies online, you may also want to queue up Loving Vincent: An Impossible Dream – it’s the documentary detailing the creative process that brought the film to life.